Research@StAndrews
 
The University of St Andrews

Research@StAndrews:FullText >
University of St Andrews Research >
University of St Andrews Research >
University of St Andrews Research >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10023/3186
This item has been viewed 2 times in the last year. View Statistics

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
journal.pone.0047008.pdf215.17 kBAdobe PDFView/Open
Title: Spontaneous emergence, imitation and spread of alternative foraging techniques among groups of vervet monkeys
Authors: van de Waal, Erica
Whiten, Andrew
Keywords: Evolutionary biology
Birds
Chimpanzees Pan-Troglodytes
Culture
Animals
Mirror neurons
Mechanisms
Premotor Cortex
QL Zoology
Issue Date: 10-Oct-2012
Citation: van de Waal , E & Whiten , A 2012 , ' Spontaneous emergence, imitation and spread of alternative foraging techniques among groups of vervet monkeys ' PLoS One , vol 7 , no. 10 , e47008 .
Abstract: Animal social learning has become a subject of broad interest, but demonstrations of bodily imitation in animals remain rare. Based on Voelkl and Huber's study of imitation by marmosets, we tested four groups of semi-captive vervet monkeys presented with food in modified film canisters (“aethipops’). One individual was trained to take the tops off canisters in each group and demonstrated five openings to them. In three groups these models used their mouth to remove the lid, but in one of the groups the model also spontaneously pulled ropes on a canister to open it. In the last group the model preferred to remove the lid with her hands. Following these spontaneous differentiations of foraging techniques in the models, we observed the techniques used by the other group members to open the canisters. We found that mouth opening was the most common technique overall, but the rope and hands methods were used significantly more in groups they were demonstrated in than in groups where they were not. Our results show bodily matching that is conventionally described as imitation. We discuss the relevance of these findings to discoveries about mirror neurons, and implications of the identity of the model for social transmission.
Version: Publisher PDF
Status: Peer reviewed
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10023/3186
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0047008
ISSN: 1932-6203
Type: Journal article
Rights: © 2012 van de Waal, Whiten. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Appears in Collections:Institute of Behavioural and Neural Sciences Research
Centre for Social Learning and Cognitive Evolution Research
Psychology & Neuroscience Research
University of St Andrews Research



This item is protected by original copyright

Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

 

DSpace Software Copyright © 2002-2012  Duraspace - Feedback
For help contact: Digital-Repository@st-andrews.ac.uk | Copyright for this page belongs to St Andrews University Library | Terms and Conditions (Cookies)