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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10023/3075
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Title: Resilience and well-being among children of migrant parents in South-East Asia
Authors: Jordan, Lucy
Graham, Elspeth
Keywords: Child well-being
Migration
South-East Asia
Resilience
GF Human ecology. Anthropogeography
Issue Date: Sep-2012
Citation: Jordan , L & Graham , E 2012 , ' Resilience and well-being among children of migrant parents in South-East Asia ' Child Development , vol 83 , no. 5 , pp. 1672-1688 .
Abstract: There has been little systematic empirical research on the well-being of children in transnational households in South-East Asia—a major sending region for contract migrants. This study uses survey data collected in 2008 from children aged 9, 10 and 11 and their caregivers in Indonesia, the Philippines, and Vietnam (N=1,498). Results indicate that while children of migrant parents, especially migrant mothers, are less likely to be happy compared to children in non-migrant households, greater resilience in child well-being is associated with longer durations of maternal absence. There is no evidence for a direct parental migration effect on school enjoyment and performance. The analyses highlight the sensitivity of results to the dimension of child well-being measured and who makes the assessment.
Version: Publisher PDF
Status: Peer reviewed
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10023/3075
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8624.2012.01810.x
ISSN: 0009-3920
Type: Journal article
Rights: This is a Wiley OnlineOpen article. © 2012 The Authors. Child Development © 2012 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.
Appears in Collections:Geography & Sustainable Development Research
University of St Andrews Research



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