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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10023/2758
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Title: The role of monocularly visible regions in depth and surface perception
Authors: Harris, Julie
Wilcox, LM
Keywords: Stereopsis
Binocular vision
da Vinci Stereopsis
Monocular regions
Half-occlusion
Monocular
BF Psychology
Issue Date: 10-Nov-2009
Citation: Harris , J & Wilcox , L M 2009 , ' The role of monocularly visible regions in depth and surface perception ' Vision Research , vol 49 , no. 22 , pp. 2666-2685 .
Abstract: The mainstream of binocular vision research has long been focused on understanding how binocular disparity is used for depth perception. In recent years, researchers have begun to explore how monocular regions in binocularly viewed scenes contribute to our perception of the three-dimensional world. Here we review the field as it currently stands, with a focus on understanding the extent to which the role of monocular regions in depth perception can be understood using extant theories of binocular vision.
Version: Postprint
Status: Peer reviewed
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10023/2758
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.visres.2009.06.021
ISSN: 0042-6989
Type: Journal article
Rights: This is an author version of this article. The published version (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd is available at http://www.sciencedirect.com
Appears in Collections:University of St Andrews Research
Psychology & Neuroscience Research



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