Research@StAndrews
 
The University of St Andrews

Research@StAndrews:FullText >
University of St Andrews Research >
University of St Andrews Research >
University of St Andrews Research >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10023/2446
This item has been viewed 2 times in the last year. View Statistics

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
Townsend2008pone0002431.pdf202.59 kBAdobe PDFView/Open
Title: Female chimpanzees use copulation calls flexibly to prevent social competition
Authors: Townsend, Simon W.
Deschner, Tobias
Zuberbuehler, Klaus
Keywords: QL Zoology
Issue Date: 18-Jun-2008
Citation: Townsend , S W , Deschner , T & Zuberbuehler , K 2008 , ' Female chimpanzees use copulation calls flexibly to prevent social competition ' PLoS One , vol 3 , no. 6 , e2431 , pp. - .
Abstract: The adaptive function of copulation calls in female primates has been debated for years. One influential idea is that copulation calls are a sexually selected trait, which enables females to advertise their receptive state to males. Male-male competition ensues and females benefit by getting better mating partners and higher quality offspring. We analysed the copulation calling behaviour of wild female chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii) at Budongo Forest, Uganda, but found no support for the male-male competition hypothesis. Hormone analysis showed that the calling behaviour of copulating females was unrelated to their fertile period and likelihood of conception. Instead, females called significantly more while with high-ranking males, but suppressed their calls if high-ranking females were nearby. Copulation calling may therefore be one potential strategy employed by female chimpanzees to advertise receptivity to high-ranked males, confuse paternity and secure future support from these socially important individuals. Competition between females can be dangerously high in wild chimpanzees, and our results indicate that females use their copulation calls strategically to minimise the risks associated with such competition.
Version: Publisher PDF
Status: Peer reviewed
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10023/2446
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0002431
ISSN: 1932-6203
Type: Journal article
Rights: © 2008 Townsend et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Appears in Collections:University of St Andrews Research
Psychology & Neuroscience Research
Centre for Social Learning and Cognitive Evolution Research
Institute of Behavioural and Neural Sciences Research



This item is protected by original copyright

Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

 

DSpace Software Copyright © 2002-2012  Duraspace - Feedback
For help contact: Digital-Repository@st-andrews.ac.uk | Copyright for this page belongs to St Andrews University Library | Terms and Conditions (Cookies)