Research@StAndrews
 
The University of St Andrews

Research@StAndrews:FullText >
Philosophical, Anthropological & Film Studies (School of) >
Philosophy >
Philosophy Theses >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10023/2115
This item has been viewed 49 times in the last year. View Statistics

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
DanielWoodMPhilThesis.pdf899.01 kBAdobe PDFView/Open
Title: The ethics of globalisation, free trade and fair trade
Authors: Wood, Daniel
Supervisors: Mulgan, Tim
Issue Date: Jun-2011
Abstract: In this thesis I take a broadly consequentialist normative position and argue that because fair trade is an inefficient method of aiding the poor, we should not support it and prefer free trade goods with an appropriate and equal donation to a charity, designed to aid the poor and encourage development in the undeveloped and developing world, instead. I also argue that globalisation is the best means of development and we should support it as well. The thesis progresses first by considering consequentialism, which I argue is especially suited to the problem of analysing poverty in applied ethics, and some objections to it, which I briefly attempt to answer. Following that, I consider fair trade and both some theoretical and practical problems that it faces which my alternative does not. Then I briefly consider how globalisation results in development and why it should be supported. Finally, I conclude with a brief chapter where I respond to a few pertinent objections which arise on the periphery of my discussion that could be seen as damaging to my position.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10023/2115
Type: Thesis
Publisher: University of St Andrews
Appears in Collections:Philosophy Theses



This item is protected by original copyright

Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

 

DSpace Software Copyright © 2002-2012  Duraspace - Feedback
For help contact: Digital-Repository@st-andrews.ac.uk | Copyright for this page belongs to St Andrews University Library | Terms and Conditions (Cookies)