Research@StAndrews
 
The University of St Andrews

Research@StAndrews:FullText >
University of St Andrews Research >
University of St Andrews Research >
University of St Andrews Research >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10023/2087
This item has been viewed 1 times in the last year. View Statistics

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
BMCGenomics2009Kabanietal10_427.pdf3.8 MBAdobe PDFView/Open
Title: Genome-wide expression profiling of in vivo-derived bloodstream parasite stages and dynamic analysis of mRNA alterations during synchronous differentiation in Trypanosoma brucei
Authors: Kabani, Sarah
Fenn, Katelyn
Ross, Alan
Ivens, Al
Smith, Terry K.
Ghazal, Peter
Matthews, Keith
Keywords: Cell-cycle progression
African trypanosomes
Life-cycle
Gene-expression
Developmental regulation
Procyclic forms
CCCH Protein
Transcriptional program
Histone deacetylases
Leishmania
QH426 Genetics
Issue Date: 11-Sep-2009
Citation: Kabani , S , Fenn , K , Ross , A , Ivens , A , Smith , T K , Ghazal , P & Matthews , K 2009 , ' Genome-wide expression profiling of in vivo-derived bloodstream parasite stages and dynamic analysis of mRNA alterations during synchronous differentiation in Trypanosoma brucei ' BMC Genomics , vol 10 , pp. 427 .
Abstract: Background: Trypanosomes undergo extensive developmental changes during their complex life cycle. Crucial among these is the transition between slender and stumpy bloodstream forms and, thereafter, the differentiation from stumpy to tsetse-midgut procyclic forms. These developmental events are highly regulated, temporally reproducible and accompanied by expression changes mediated almost exclusively at the post-transcriptional level. Results: In this study we have examined, by whole-genome microarray analysis, the mRNA abundance of genes in slender and stumpy forms of T. brucei AnTat1.1 cells, and also during their synchronous differentiation to procyclic forms. In total, five biological replicates representing the differentiation of matched parasite populations derived from five individual mouse infections were assayed, with RNAs being derived at key biological time points during the time course of their synchronous differentiation to procyclic forms. Importantly, the biological context of these mRNA profiles was established by assaying the coincident cellular events in each population (surface antigen exchange, morphological restructuring, cell cycle re-entry), thereby linking the observed gene expression changes to the well-established framework of trypanosome differentiation. Conclusion: Using stringent statistical analysis and validation of the derived profiles against experimentally-predicted gene expression and phenotypic changes, we have established the profile of regulated gene expression during these important life-cycle transitions. The highly synchronous nature of differentiation between stumpy and procyclic forms also means that these studies of mRNA profiles are directly relevant to the changes in mRNA abundance within individual cells during this well-characterised developmental transition.
Version: Publisher PDF
Status: Peer reviewed
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10023/2087
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2164-10-427
ISSN: 1471-2164
Type: Journal article
Rights: © 2009 Kabani et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Appears in Collections:University of St Andrews Research
Biology Research
Biomedical Sciences Research Complex (BSRC) Research



This item is protected by original copyright

Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

 

DSpace Software Copyright © 2002-2012  Duraspace - Feedback
For help contact: Digital-Repository@st-andrews.ac.uk | Copyright for this page belongs to St Andrews University Library | Terms and Conditions (Cookies)