Research@StAndrews
 
The University of St Andrews

Research@StAndrews:FullText >
University of St Andrews Research >
University of St Andrews Research >
University of St Andrews Research >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10023/2050
This item has been viewed 61 times in the last year. View Statistics

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
Bavaj_The_West_EGO_.pdf357.33 kBAdobe PDFView/Open
Title: “The West” : A conceptual exploration
Authors: Bavaj, Riccardo Beniamino Francesco Luca
Keywords: Western Civilization
The West
Conceptual History
Intellectual History
D History (General)
CB History of civilization
Issue Date: 2011
Citation: Bavaj , R B F L 2011 , ' “The West” : A conceptual exploration ' Europäische Geschichte Online .
Abstract: This article explores the transformation of the directional concept "the west" into the socio-political concept "the West". From the early 19th century onward, the concept of the West became temporalized and politicized. It became a concept of the future ("Zukunftsbegriff"), acquired a polemical thrust through the polarized opposition to antonyms such as "Russia", "the East", and "the Orient", and was deployed as a tool for forging national identities. The gestation of "the West" went hand-in-hand with the gradual substitution of an east-west divide for the north-south divide that had dominated European mental maps for centuries.
Version: Postprint
Description: Published by the Institute of European History (IEG), Mainz 2011-11-21. When quoting this article please add the date of your last retrieval in brackets after the url. When quoting a certain passage from the article please also insert the corresponding number(s), for example 2 or 1-4.
Status: Peer reviewed
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10023/2050
http://www.ieg-ego.eu/bavajr-2011-en
ISSN: 2192-7405
Type: Journal article
Rights: This text is licensed under: CC by-nc-nd - Attribution, Noncommercial, No Derivative Works.
Appears in Collections:University of St Andrews Research
History Research



This item is protected by original copyright

Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

 

DSpace Software Copyright © 2002-2012  Duraspace - Feedback
For help contact: Digital-Repository@st-andrews.ac.uk | Copyright for this page belongs to St Andrews University Library | Terms and Conditions (Cookies)