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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10023/2026
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Title: Migrant parents and the psychological well-being of left-behind children in Southeast Asia
Authors: Graham, Elspeth
Jordan, Lucy
Keywords: Asian-Pacific
Islander families
Childhood
Children
Cross-national
Immigration
Migrant families
Mental health
Well-being
HQ The family. Marriage. Woman
GF Human ecology. Anthropogeography
Issue Date: Aug-2011
Citation: Graham , E & Jordan , L 2011 , ' Migrant parents and the psychological well-being of left-behind children in Southeast Asia ' Journal of Marriage and Family , vol 73 , no. 4 , pp. 763-787 .
Abstract: Several million children currently live in transnational families, yet little is known about impacts on their health. We investigated the psychological well-being of left-behind children in four Southeast Asian countries. Data were drawn from the CHAMPSEA study. Caregiver reports from the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) were used to examine differences among children under age 12 by the migration status of their household (N = 3,876). We found no general pattern across the four study countries: Indonesia, the Philippines, Thailand, and Vietnam. Multivariate models showed that children of migrant fathers in Indonesia and Thailand are more likely to have poor psychological well-being, compared to children in nonmigrant households. This finding was not replicated for the Philippines or Vietnam. The paper concludes by arguing for more contextualized understandings.
Version: Publisher PDF
Description: This work was supported by the Wellcome Trust [grant number GR079946/B/06/Z and GR079946/Z/06Z].
Status: Peer reviewed
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10023/2026
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1741-3737.2011.00844.x
ISSN: 0022-2445
Type: Journal article
Rights: (c)2011 National Council on Family Relations. This Wiley OnlineOpen article, deposited by permission of the publisher, may be used for non-commercial purposes.
Appears in Collections:Geography & Sustainable Development Research
University of St Andrews Research
Geography & Geosciences Research



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