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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10023/1972
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Title: Placing Paamese : locating concerns with place, gender and movement in Vanuatu
Authors: Lind, Craig
Supervisors: Crook, Tony
Keywords: Paama
Paamese
Vanuatu
Melanesia
Place
Personhood
Gender
Movement
Stasis
Name (isen)
Sand drawing
New Melanesia ethnography
Analogic
Road (sise)
Origin (vatte)
Corporeality
Thing
Port Vila
Seaside
Urban
Rural
Kinship
Exchange
Agnatic clan
Naming
Kastom
Sociality
Lopevi
Sibling
Mother's brother
Issue Date: Jun-2011
Abstract: This is a study of coming to know what it is to be Paamese. The work seeks to present an anthropological understanding of ontological concerns that constitute a Paamese perception of subjectivities. I take my lead from Paamese perceptions that the internal capacities of subjects or “things” (e.g. persons, villages, islands, and movement itself) are revealed through relations with others. This correlates with anthropology’s methodology of testing its analytical strategies through the ethnographic practices of others in order to reach more accurate representations. Paamese, as is common elsewhere in Vanuatu and Melanesia, have an extremely fluid attitude towards sociality and easily accommodate urban dwelling without leaving Paama behind. I suggest that a nuanced multi-positioned approach in which several aspects of Paamese sociality are considered from a point of limitation employed by Paamese to focus an event, such as a marriage exchange, will present a better understanding of how these subjectivities, that is Paamese people and Paama Island, adhere such that they do not part company wherever they go. Paamese suggest that each event should be considered as if following a single branch in the canopy of a tree – a scalable perception that offers the promise that a multi-faceted approach will reveal a replicable form. I take this approach to specificity seriously and employ a looping aesthetic, measi, adapted from Paamese sand-drawing in order to consider the shifting concerns expressed by Paamese perceptions of out (place), āmal (agnatic clans), sise (road), vatte (origin), ara (blood) and asi (bone). I suggest that these, parts, can be considered together as a holography for how to come to know what it is to be Paamese.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10023/1972
Type: Thesis
Publisher: University of St Andrews
Appears in Collections:Social Anthropology Theses



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