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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10023/1844
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Title: A scalable architecture for the demand-driven deployment of location-neutral software services
Authors: MacInnis, Robert F.
Supervisors: Dearle, Alan
Issue Date: 2010
Abstract: This thesis presents a scalable service-oriented architecture for the demand-driven deployment of location-neutral software services, using an end-to-end or ‘holistic’ approach to address identified shortcomings of the traditional Web Services model. The architecture presents a multi-endpoint Web Service environment which abstracts over Web Service location and technology and enables the dynamic provision of highly-available Web Services. The model describes mechanisms which provide a framework within which Web Services can be reliably addressed, bound to, and utilized, at any time and from any location. The presented model eases the task of providing a Web Service by consuming deployment and management tasks. It eases the development of consumer agent applications by letting developers program against what a service does, not where it is or whether it is currently deployed. It extends the platform-independent ethos of Web Services by providing deployment mechanisms which can be used independent of implementation and deployment technologies. Crucially, it maintains the Web Service goal of universal interoperability, preserving each actor’s view upon the system so that existing Service Consumers and Service Providers can participate without any modifications to provider agent or consumer agent application code. Lastly, the model aims to enable the efficient consumption of hosting resources by providing mechanisms to dynamically apply and reclaim resources based upon measured consumer demand.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10023/1844
Type: Thesis
Publisher: University of St Andrews
Appears in Collections:Computer Science Theses



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