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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10023/1803
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Title: Collaboration and composition : Issues for a second generation process language
Authors: Warboys, B C
Balasubramaniam, D
Greenwood, R M
Kirby, G N C
Mayes, K
Morrison, R
Munro, D S
Editors: Nierstrasz, O
Lemoine, M
Keywords: Process languages
Process-based environments
Persistence
Concurrency control
Hyper-programming
QA76 Computer software
Issue Date: 1999
Citation: Warboys , B C , Balasubramaniam , D , Greenwood , R M , Kirby , G N C , Mayes , K , Morrison , R & Munro , D S 1999 , ' Collaboration and composition : Issues for a second generation process language ' . in O Nierstrasz & M Lemoine (eds) , 7th European Software Engineering Conference / 7th ACM SIGSOFT Symposium on the Foundations of Software Engineering : ESEC/FSE '99, Toulouse, France, 1999 . Lecture Notes in Computer Science , vol. 1687 , Springer , pp. 75-90 , 7th European Software Engineering Conference / 7th ACM SIGSOFT Symposium on the Foundations of Software Engineering , Toulouse , France , 6 September .
conference
Series/Report no.: Lecture Notes in Computer Science
Abstract: Over the past decade a variety of process languages have been defined and applied to software engineering environments. The idea of using a process language to encode a software process as a "process model", and enacting this using a process-sensitive environment is now well established. Many prototype process-sensitive environments have been developed; but their use in earnest has been limited. We are designing a second generation process language which is a significant departure from current conventional thinking. Firstly a process is viewed as a set of mediated collaborations rather than a set of partially ordered activities. Secondly emphasis is given to how process models are developed, used, and enhanced over a potentially long lifetime. In particular the issue of composing both new and existing model fragments is central to our development approach. This paper outlines these features, and gives the motivations behind them. It also presents a view of process support for software engineering drawing on our decade of experience in exploiting a "first generation" process language, and our experience in designing and exploiting programming languages.
Version: Postprint
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10023/1803
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/3-540-48166-4_6
ISSN: 0302-9743
Type: Conference item
Rights: This is an author version of the conference contribution. The original publication (c)1999 Springer-Verlag is available at www.springerlink.com
Publisher: Springer
Appears in Collections:University of St Andrews Research
Computer Science Research



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