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Title: Normal patterns of deja experience in a healthy, blind male : Challenging optical pathway delay theory
Authors: O'Connor, Akira R.
Moulin, Christopher J. A.
Keywords: Deja vu
Microphthalmos
Temporal-lobe epilepsy
Vu experience
Memory
BF Psychology
RC0321 Neuroscience. Biological psychiatry. Neuropsychiatry
Issue Date: Dec-2006
Citation: O'Connor , A R & Moulin , C J A 2006 , ' Normal patterns of deja experience in a healthy, blind male : Challenging optical pathway delay theory ' Brain and Cognition , vol 62 , no. 3 , pp. 246-249 .
Abstract: We report the case of a 25-year-old healthy, blind male, MT, who experiences normal patterns of deja vu. The optical pathway delay theory of deja vu formation assumes that neuronal input from the optical pathways is necessary for the formation of the experience. Surprisingly, although the sensation of deja vu is known to be experienced by blind individuals, we believe this to be the first reported application of this knowledge to the understanding of the phenomenon. Visual input is not present in MT, yet the experiences he describes are consistent with reports in the literature of deja vu occurrence in sighted people. The fact that blind people can experience deja vu challenges the optical pathway delay theory, and alternative causes are briefly discussed. (c) 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Version: Postprint
Description: Funded by an ESRC studentship
Status: Peer reviewed
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10023/1650
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bandc.2006.06.004
ISSN: 0278-2626
Type: Journal article
Rights: This is an author version of an article published in Brain and Cognition 62(3), available at http://www.sciencedirect.com
Appears in Collections:University of St Andrews Research
Psychology & Neuroscience Research



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