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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10023/1628
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Title: Rapid primary productivity changes in one of the last coastal rainforests : the case of Kahua, Solomon Islands
Authors: Garonna, Irene
Fazey, Ioan Raymond Albert
Brown, Molly E.
Pettorelli, Nathalie
Keywords: MODIS (moderate-resolution imaging spectro-radiometer)
NDVI (normalized difference vegetation index)
primary productivity
Solomon Islands
Tropical forests
AVHRR DATA
Satellite data
South America
Vegetation
Climate
Environment
Adaptation
Cover
NDVI
QH Natural history
Issue Date: Sep-2009
Citation: Garonna , I , Fazey , I R A , Brown , M E & Pettorelli , N 2009 , ' Rapid primary productivity changes in one of the last coastal rainforests : the case of Kahua, Solomon Islands ' Environmental Conservation , vol 36 , no. 3 , pp. 253-260 .
Abstract: The growth of human populations has many direct and indirect impacts on tropical forest ecosystems both locally and globally. This is particularly true in the Solon-ion Islands, where coastal rainforest cover still remains, but where climate change and a growing human Population is putting increasing pressure on ecosystems. This study assessed recent primary productivity changes in the Kahua region (Makira, Solomon Islands) using remote sensing data (normalized difference vegetation index, NDVI). In this area, there has been no commercial logging and there is no existing information about the state of the forests. Results indicate that primary productivity has been decreasing in recent years, and that the recent changes arc more marked near vi I]ages. Multiple factors may explain the reported pattern in primary productivity. The study highlights the need to (1) assess how accurately remote sensing data-based results match field data on the ground; (2) identify, the relative contribution of the climatic, socioeconomic and political drivers of such changes; and (3) evaluate how primary productivity changes affect biodiversity level, ecosystem functioning and human livelihoods.
Version: Publisher PDF
Status: Peer reviewed
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10023/1628
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0376892909990208
ISSN: 0376-8929
Type: Journal article
Rights: (c)2009 Foundation for Environmental Conservation
Appears in Collections:Geography & Sustainable Development Research
University of St Andrews Research
Geography & Geosciences Research
Scottish Oceans Institute Research



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