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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10023/1048
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Title: The helicase XPD unwinds bubble structures and is not stalled by DNA lesions removed by the nucleotide excision repair pathway
Authors: Rudolf, Jana
Rouillon, Christophe
Schwarz-Linek, Ulrich
White, Malcolm F
Keywords: Replication protein-a
Escherichia-coli
Binding-protein
Saccharomyces-cerevisiae
Sulfolobus-solfataricus
Substrate-specificity
Breast-cancer
RAD3 Protein
Damage
Archaeal
QH426 Genetics
Issue Date: Jan-2010
Citation: Rudolf , J , Rouillon , C , Schwarz-Linek , U & White , M F 2010 , ' The helicase XPD unwinds bubble structures and is not stalled by DNA lesions removed by the nucleotide excision repair pathway ' Nucleic Acids Research , vol 38 , no. 3 , pp. 931-941 .
Abstract: Xeroderma pigmentosum factor D (XPD) is a 5'-3' superfamily 2 helicase and the founding member of a family of DNA helicases with iron-sulphur cluster domains. As a component of transcription factor II H (TFIIH), XPD is involved in DNA unwinding during nucleotide excision repair (NER). Archaeal XPD is closely related in sequence to the eukaryal enzyme and the crystal structure of the archaeal enzyme has provided a molecular understanding of mutations causing xeroderma pigmentosum and trichothiodystrophy in humans. Consistent with a role in NER, we show that archaeal XPD can initiate unwinding from a DNA bubble structure, differentiating it from the related helicases FancJ and DinG. XPD was not stalled by substrates containing extrahelical fluorescein adducts, abasic sites nor a cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer, regardless of whether these modifications were placed on either the displaced or translocated strands. This suggests that DNA lesions repaired by NER may not present a barrier to XPD translocation in vivo, in contrast to some predictions. Preferential binding of a fluorescein-adducted oligonucleotide was observed, and XPD helicase activity was readily inhibited by both single- and double-stranded DNA binding proteins. These observations have several implications for the current understanding of the NER pathway.
Version: Publisher PDF
Status: Peer reviewed
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10023/1048
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/nar/gkp1058
ISSN: 0305-1048
Type: Journal article
Rights: © The Author(s) 2009. Published by Oxford University Press. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.5/uk/) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Appears in Collections:University of St Andrews Research
Biology Research
Biomedical Sciences Research Complex (BSRC) Research



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