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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10023/1047
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Title: The archaeo-eukaryotic GINS proteins and the archaeal primase catalytic subunit PriS share a common domain
Authors: Swiatek, Agnieszka
MacNeill, Stuart Andrew
Keywords: QH301 Biology
Issue Date: 12-Apr-2010
Citation: Swiatek , A & MacNeill , S A 2010 , ' The archaeo-eukaryotic GINS proteins and the archaeal primase catalytic subunit PriS share a common domain ' Biology Direct , vol 5 , no. 1 , pp. 17 .
Abstract: Primase and GINS are essential factors for chromosomal DNA replication in eukaryotic and archaeal cells. Here we describe a previously undetected relationship between the C-terminal domain of the catalytic subunit (PriS) of archaeal primase and the B-domains of the archaeo-eukaryotic GINS proteins in the form of a conserved structural domain comprising a three-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet adjacent to an alpha-helix and a two-stranded beta-sheet or hairpin. The presence of a shared domain in archaeal PriS and GINS proteins, the genes for which are often found adjacent on the chromosome, suggests simple mechanisms for the evolution of these proteins.
Version: Publisher PDF
Description: This work was funded by the Scottish Universities Life Sciences Alliance (SULSA).
Status: Peer reviewed
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10023/1047
http://www.biology-direct.com/content/5/1/17
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1745-6150-5-17
ISSN: 1745-6150
Type: Journal article
Rights: This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Appears in Collections:University of St Andrews Research
Biology Research
Biomedical Sciences Research Complex (BSRC) Research



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